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Spotify Playlist Showcases Songs for CPR, Like “Stayin’ Alive” These Tunes Are 100 Beats Per Minute

CPR, when performed properly,  can increase the chances of surviving cardiac arrest. More important than going really fast is to set a steady tempo to keep blood pumping, much like a regular heartbeat. The rate of compressions should be between 100 and 120 beats per minute. Oftentimes, the Bee Gees classic “Stayin’ Alive” is used to help keep pace, but there are a number songs from different times and genres with the same tempo. In those chaotic moments when you’re trying to save a life, any of these songs will help you focus on a regular rhythm. This playlist developed by New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Spotify “Songs to do CPR to” playlist, help administer chest compressions at a steady pace. They’ve selected more than 40 songs that are all 100 beats per minute, the recommended tempo for CPR.

From the classics, like the Bee Gees’ “Stayin’ Alive” and “Dancing Queen” by ABBA, to more contemporary, there are songs for everyone to have something to sing in their head during a critical moment. Movie buffs will appreciate the Star Wars Imperial March, while more contemporary options like Adele’s “Rumor Has It” and Justin Bieber’s “Sorry” might be more familiar to the younger set.

Most cardiac arrests happen in homes or private settings. The American Heart Association estimates over 90 percent of those people die before making it to the hospital. If performed properly, CPR can double or triple the chances of survival. Initiating CPR as soon as possible is important because it keeps the blood oxygenated. It oxygen is not circulating throughout the body, the brain dies.

To take a look at the New-York Presbyterian Spotify playlist, click here.

 

 

One Beat’s Staff Firefighters Complete 3rd Annual New York City Memorial Stair Climb

On March 19th 2017, more than 400 first responders representing the 23 NYPD, 37 PAPD and 343 FDNY ascended the 72 floors of 4 World Trade Center in the 3rd Annual New York City Memorial Stair Climb. While each first responder climbs in honor of one of the over 400 FDNY, NYPD and PAPD killed on September 11th 2001, the climb also memorializes fallen first responders and military personnel worldwide.

Rick Standing next to Capt. Michael Esposito’s name on the Memorial

The Cook Family

One Beat CPR + AED’s Rick Cook, retired Chief of Coral Gables Fire Department, Daniel Cook of the Hollywood Fire Department, and Jeff Cook, also from the Coral Gables Fire Department, went to NYC for the stair climb. Each climbed for a specific firefighter who died in 9/11.

The New York City Memorial Stair Climb is foremost a memorial climb; however, each year they designate a beneficiary and mount a fundraising campaign for the organization. The climb also taps into firefighters’ competitive spirit. Climbers have the option to enter as a racer and be timed against other climbers as an individual or part of a team.

The NYC Memorial Stair Climb proudly supports Friends of Firefighters and The 9/11 Tribute Center as its 2017 beneficiaries.

Friends of Firefighters is dedicated to addressing the physical, mental health, and wellness needs of New York City’s firefighters and their families. Our ongoing mission is to provide long-term support and services through confidential counseling, wellness services, and other assistance required by firefighters and their families.

The 9/11 Tribute Center invites visitors to share personal stories of the 9/11 community – family members who lost loved ones, survivors, first responders and rescue workers, civilian volunteers, and community residents whose healing is a testament to the perseverance of the human spirit.